Radiometric dating problem

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Roman poet Lucretius, intellectual heir to the Greek atomists, believed its formation must have been relatively recent, given that there were no records going back beyond the Trojan War.The Talmudic rabbis, Martin Luther and others used the biblical account to extrapolate back from known history and came up with rather similar estimates for when the earth came into being.It was not until 1926, when (under the influence of Arthur Holmes, whose name recurs throughout this story) the National Academy of Sciences adopted the radiometric timescale, that we can regard the controversy as finally resolved.Critical to this resolution were improved methods of dating, which incorporated advances in mass spectrometry, sampling and laser heating.Even less should we let that knowledge influence our judgment of the players, acting as they did in their own time, constrained by the concepts and data then available.One outstanding feature of this drama is the role played by those who themselves were not, or not exclusively, geologists.It is a drama consisting of a prologue and three acts, complex characters, and no clear heroes or villains.

radiometric dating problem-46

radiometric dating problem-45

The second act of the drama sees a prolonged attempt by a new generation of geologists to estimate the age of the earth from observational evidence, to come up with an answer that would satisfy the demands of newly dominant evolutionary thinking, and to reconcile this answer with the constraints imposed by thermodynamics.

His achievements ran from helping formulate the laws of thermodynamics to advising on the first transatlantic telegraph cable. Shelton was a philosopher of science, critical (as shown in his contribution, the 1915 article “Sea-Salt and Geologic Time”) of loose thinking and a defender of evolution in debates.

Harlow Shapley, who wrote an article in 1919 on the subject, was an astronomer, responsible for the detection of the redshift in distant nebulae and hence, indirectly, for our present concept of an expanding universe. Russell, author of the 1921 article on radioactive dating, was familiar to me for his part in developing the Hetzsprung-Russell diagram for stars, but I was surprised to discover that he was also the Russell of Russell-Saunders coupling, important in atomic structure theory. The prologue to the drama is the mid-19th century recognition of the relation between heat and other kinds of energy (see the 1857 article “Source of the Sun’s Heat”).

The first argument was completely undermined after taking into account the amount of heat generated by radioactive decay.

The second depended on highly dubious theories of formation of the earth and moon and plays relatively little role in this compilation.

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